4a) Input: Reading Reviews

Title:

“Abstraction and Complexity”

Author:

Lev Manovich

Book:

Media Art Histories, Grau, Chapter 16, Page 349

Comments:

In the case of the advancement of computer images, mainly those that are software driven abstractions; this essay tries to predict the future of modification to this type of visual art.  As not only computers themselves are becoming mainstays in everyday applications it is the global network that is making art by abstraction readily available.  The essay looks back at different periods in the twentieth century when artwork followed sociological improvements.  Such as the modernist movement that followed modern science, but the artwork in the modernist movement was simple, almost a reduction to the previous movements of abstraction.Following this scenario, the question is asked whether this will be the same for computer art and images.  The lessons here are that we are just beginning to understand computer base imaging and unlike the predecessor of the scenario, the simple use of computer based art is one that is based on the current understandings of methods and knowledge.  Even as the abstraction of art is expanding, the process is yielding complexity to an unknown amount of variation.  Computer art is no longer static.  It holds not time nor barriers the only opposition will be in the beholder. 

 


 

Title:

“Between a Bach and a Bard Place: Productive Constraint in Early Computer Arts”

Author:

Douglas Kahn

Book:

Media Art Histories, Grau, Chapter 21, Page 423

Comments:

A pun of course, as other articles in this series of writings from Grau’s book look towards the accepted good; this article looks at the early computer art and expands into computer literature and music.  Due to early stages of the roughness of computer art is what has given art in the nature a bad name, hence bad computer art.  Untrained but experimental artists strived to create various forms of accepted art but were mostly unaccepted.   Art though in this period of “badness” has been identified as in the time from the first mainframes in the 1950’s to the first computers that sat on kitchen tables at the end of the 1970’s.  Following trends in early visual arts the audio and perception arts are reviewed for complacency into the unknown territory of this expanding art field.  Other than trying to call computer art bad, it is interesting to try and figure out if the author is calling computer literary or audio art bad, as he gives some extreme examples in case and point.

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