1a) Input: Reading Reviews

Title:

From Film To Interactive Art: Transformations in Media Arts

Author:

Ryszard W. Kluszczynski

Book:

Media Art Histories, Grau, Chapter 11, Page 207

Comments:

This article takes a chronicle look of the media arts by starting at the beginning, which is film and cinema film, then acknowledging the stages that took place over time.  These stages are not only in the form of technological inputs but also be sociological events. The first stage after cinema and film we have new media cinema, a result of the electronic age of media participants.  First are those that a changing the course by changing methods. Second, as apparatus’ bring about the changes: such as tape, disk and hard drives; with communications by fibers and satellites. Third would be the changes by interactivity with computer advancements. And lastly, are the changes from the introduction of the internet. But in all the cases above change happens anyway as a result of improvements and interest shifting. The next stage in change is the advent with television and parallel with cassette video.  It is as if one was meant for the other as the two advances catapulted social change in the value of public and private entertainment. The next stage of change is brought about from opposing views on interactivity by deconstruction to cyberculture. The final shift occurs with the label of interactive art and hypertext art, which is a point in time as when this article was written.  It is basically defining the culmination of media art as belonging not only to the author-creator but as a co-creator of the spectator. 

 

 

Title:

There Are No Visual Media

Author:

W.J.T. Mitchell

Book:

Media Art Histories, Grau, Chapter 19, Page 395

Comments:

This article is absurd!  Saying that one sector of art “Visual Media” is not visual because the artist thought about it before creating it or that the artist used his hands to put brush to paper or because a viewer puts words into it to define it.  Language and communication is what makes art in the first place.  All other forms of art are tiered down from this interpreting defining factor.  Even the blank canvas is art.

Take for instance the blank canvas in the last room of the Holocaust Museum in Washington DC, the museum tour brings out so many emotions that the blank canvas at the end of the tour allows one to re-think, or reinterpret ones thoughts before exiting the museum.  In my opinion, making the blank canvas an extreme example of visual art.

 

 

Title:

It Is Forbidden Not To Touch

Author:

Peter Weibel

Book:

Media Art Histories, Grau, Chapter 3, Page 21

Comments:

This article puts into perspective the origins of Interactive Art.  Most believe that interactivity began with the computer because of the pure nature of using an interface: the keyboard, the mouse, the monitor, or the processor.  But when put into these terms of using an interface one can compare early versions of kinetic art as having an interface.  For this example Weibel cites the art piece Kinetic Construction No. 1, by Naum Gabo; the piece consists of a rod and motor.  When activated the motor gives volume to the rod, hence we have interactivity that creates visual art.  Many more examples are given in which give rise to computer interactivity. Weibel states that “kineticism produced elements which played an important role in the further development of art: virtuality, the environment, the active spectator, and/or the user.” Thus formulating that interactivity was in place before the computer by either analog or mechanical form.

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